Moorish Tiles Square- Moogly CAL 2020

I love starting off the year with the Moogly CAL! It is a great year long project that makes new squares every two weeks. By the end of the year, you have an afghan. It is always a fun project with many inspirational squares.

I am fortunate enough to share my square with you. To check out all the others make sure and follow along here.

This square uses a stitch often called a Catherine Wheel. Essentially it is a row of decrease, and a row of large shell worked in the center of the decrease. This makes a circle in the fabric. Learn more about this technique with my free charity square, 1 for Me, 1 For You- Rolling Along.

I have been playing with this stitch a bit lately. Taking a liking to working a contrasting color row between the “circles”, I have also found that by working slip stitches where this classic stitch works single crochets, creates a bit of a tighter fabric. This is beneficial, as sometimes this stitch technique can become a bit open and “gappy” at the edges of the circles.

The name really came from how the design struck me. It has reminded me of the mosaics I have seen in art books, and inspires me to want to travel.

Moorish Tiles Square

Materials

*Red Heart With Love, #1542 Aubergine (A), #1207 Cornsilk (B), #1562 Jadeite (C), #1001 White (D), #1623, Mallard (E)

*Hook J/10/ 6.00mm

Gauge

12”x 12” square (30.5 x 30.5cm)

Special Stitches

Double Crochet 6 Together (dc6tog): Working over the next 6 sts, [yo, insert hook into next st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through 2 loops] six times, yo, pull through all 7 loops on hook.

Double Crochet 7 Together (dc7tog): Working over the next 7 sts, [yo, insert hook into next st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through 2 loops] seven times, yo, pull through all 8 loops on hook.

Double Crochet 9 Together (dc9tog): Working over the next 9 sts, [yo, insert hook into next st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through 2 loops] nine times, yo, pull through all 10 loops on hook.

Notes/Tips

Single crochet stitches are worked over slip stitches, this may be up to 3 rows, creating a break in color.

When working the last round, work the single crochet stitches into the chain stitches and not the space (with the exception of the corners), so as not to create open gaps.

Learn how to work a Standing Single Crochet here.

The Pattern

Rnd1: With A, ch 4, sl st to first ch to create ring, (ch 5 counts as dc + ch 2, [2 dc, sl st, 2 dc, ch 2] three times, 2 dc, sl st, dc, sl st to 3rd ch of beg ch) in the ring. Fasten off. -16 dc, 4 sl st, 4 ch-2 sps

First Round with Single Crochet over Slip Stitches

Rnd 2: With B, join with a standing sc in any ch-2 sp see notes to work a Standing Single Crochet, ch 2, sc in same sp, [sc in next 2 dc, sc over sl st  in ring, sc in next 2 dc, (sc, ch 2, sc) in ch-2 sp] three times, sc in next 2 dc, sc over sl st in ring, sc in next 2 dc, join. Fasten off. -28 sc, 4 ch-2 sps

Rnd 3: With C, join with a sl st in any ch-2 sp, ch 2, sl st in same sp, [ch 3, dc7tog, ch 3, (sl st, ch 2, sl st) in ch-2 sp] three times, ch 3, dc7tog, ch 3, join in ch-2 sp. -4 dc7tog, 8 sl sts, 4 ch-2 sps

Rnd 4: ch 2, sl st in same sp, [9 dc in center dc7tog, (sl st, ch 2, sl st) in ch-2 sp] three times, 9 dc in center dc7tog, join. Fasten off. -36 dc, 8 sl st, 4 ch-2 sps

Second Round with Single Crochet over Slip Stitches

Rnd 5: With D, join with a standing sc in any ch-2 sp, ch 2, sc in same sp, sc over sl st into sp 3 rows below, [sc in each st to next sl st, sc over sl st into sp 3 rows below, (sc, ch 2, sc) in ch-2 sp, sc over sl st into sp 3 rows below] three times, sc in each st to next sl st, sc over sl st into sp 3 rows below, join. Fasten off. – 52 sc, 4 ch-2 sps

Rnd 6: With E, join to any ch-2 sp, ch 5 counts as dc + ch 2, dc in same sp, [ch 3, dc6tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc6tog, ch 3, (dc, ch 2, dc) in ch-2 sp] three times, ch 3, dc6tog, ch 3, join to 3rd ch.  – 8 dc6tog, 4 sl st, 4 (dc, ch 2, dc)

Rnd 7: Sl st in ch-2 sp, ch 2, sl st in same sp, [9 dc in dc6tog, sl st in next sl st, 9 dc in dc6tog, (sl st, ch 2, sl st) in next ch-2 sp] three times, 9 dc in dcs6tog, sl st in next sl st, 9 dc in dc6tog, join. Fasten off. -72 dc, 12 sl st, 4 ch-2 sps

Third Round with Single Crochet over Slip Stitches

Rnd 8: With B, join with a standing sc in any ch-2 sp, ch 2, sc in same sp, [sc over sl st into sp 3 rows below, sc in each st to next sl st, sc over sl st into st 3 rows below, sc in each st to next sl st, sc over sl st into sp 3 rows below, (sc, ch 2, sc) in ch-2 sp] three times, sc over sl st into sp 3 rows below, sc in each st to next sl st, sc over sl st into st 3 rows below, sc in each st to next sl st, sc over sl st into sp 3 rows below, join. Fasten off. -92 sc, 4 ch-2 sps

Rnd 9: With A, join in any ch-2 sp, ch 5 counts as dc + ch 2, dc in same sp, [ch 3, dc6tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc9tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc6tog, ch 3, (dc, ch 2, dc) in ch-2 sp ] three times, ch 3, dc6tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc9tog, ch 3, so 1st in next st, ch 3, dc6tog, ch 3, join to 3rd ch. – 4 dc9tog, 8 dc6tog, 8 sl sts, 4 (dc, ch 2, dc)

Rnd10: Sl st in ch-2 sp, ch 2, sl st in same st, [9 dc in dc6tog, sl st in next sl st, 9 dc in dc9tog, sl st in next sl st, 9 dc in dc6tog, (sl st, ch 2, sl st) in ch-2 sp] three times, 9 dc in dc6tog, sl st in next sl st, 9 dc in dc9tog, sl st in next sl st, 9 dc in dc6tog, join. Fasten off. – 108 dc, 16 sl sts, 4 ch-2 sps

Fourth Round with Single Crochet over Slip Stitches

Rnd 11: With D, join with a standing sc in any ch-2 sp, ch 2, sc in same sp, {sc over sl st into sp 3 rows below, [sc in each st to next sl st, sc over sl st into st 3 rows below] twice, sc in each st to next sl st, sc over sl st into sp 3 rows below, (sc, ch 2, sc) in ch-2 sp} three times, sc over sl st into sp 3 rows below [ sc in each st to next sl st, sc over sl st into st 3 rows below] twice, sc in each st to next sl st, sc over sl st into sp 3 rows below, join. Fasten off. -132 sc, 4 ch-2 sps

Row 12: With C, join to any ch-2 sp, ch 5 counts as dc + ch 2, dc in same sp, {ch 3, dc6tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc9tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc9tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc6tog, ch 3, (dc, ch 2, dc) in ch-2 sp) three times, ch 3, dc6tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc9tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc9tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc6tog, ch 3, join to 3rd ch. -8 dc9tog, 8 dc6tog, 12 sl sts, 4 (dc, ch 2, dc)

Last Round, Work in Chains, and Single Crochet over Slip Stitches

Row 13: See notes. Ch 1, sc in same st, [(sc, ch 2, sc) in ch-2 sp, sc in each st and ch across to next ch-2 sp] three times, (sc, ch 2, sc) in next ch-2 sp, sc in each st and ch across to last st, join. Fasten off. Weave in ends. Block. -140 sc, 4 ch-2 sps

1 for Me, 1 for You- Rolling Along Block

Help me help local communities by creating blocks for Warm Up America, by making a block for yourself and one for a community project with this free pattern. I will be creating a new block every few weeks and sharing it with you, I just ask that make one for donation.

Warm Up America is a nationwide organization that encourages local donations, but will also except donations to be sent to their office so that blocks can be assembled and then blankets can be donated through the United States.

Rolling Along Block

Even if you do not want to participate with Warm Up America, please consider creating blocks, or blankets for your local community. There are various places in every community that accept donations.

Rolling Along Block

Working the Catherine’s Wheel

Catherine’s Wheel is a classic crochet stitch that works one row of shells over a row of decreases to create a circle or wheel look. I have made a couple of changes to the classic pattern. For starters instead of working a single crochet after completing the shell or decrease, I work a slip stitch. I find that this help prevent “gapping” that occurs in the chain 3 area.

Working a dc9tog, you will have 10 loops on the hook.
Yarn over and pull through all the loops on the hook.
Slip stitch worked after the chain 3, to secure the decrease.
Working a decrease on the corner, dc5tog.

I should also point out that I work the shells in “the center of the decrease”, this is the biggest opening. However it is really not the completion of the decrease stitch, but the third chain. I feel that working here emphasizes the “center”, when working in the actual point of completion just looks a bit wonky.

Work the Shell in the center of the decrease, it creates a “hole”.
Working a shell at the beginning of a row means working in the center of the decrease.

I do have an exception to this, and that is when finishing a row with a shell it needs to be worked in the top of the turning chain to keep the edge straight. This will be just over from the “center”.

The “exception” the last shell is worked in the top of the turning chain, this helps to keep a straight edge.

Gauge

7”x9” rectangle

Materials

Medium weight yarn, in 2 colors MC (main color), CC1

K/10 ½/6.5mm crochet hook

Special Stitches

Double crochet 4 together (dc4tog): Working over the next 4 sts, [yo, insert hook into next st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through 2 loops] six times, yo, pull through all 5 loops on hook.

Double crochet 5 together (dc5tog): Working over the next 5 sts, [yo, insert hook into next st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through 2 loops] six times, yo, pull through all 6 loops on hook.

Double crochet 9 together (dc9tog): Working over the next 9 sts, [yo, insert hook into next st, yo, pull up a loop, yo, pull through 2 loops] six times, yo, pull through all 10 loops on hook.

Note:

Change colors without fastening off the yarn. Instead carry the yarn along the edge, and it will be hidden in the edging round. Here are some tips for do it.

The Pattern

With MC Chain 25

Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hook, [sk 3 chs, 9 dc in next ch, sk 3 chs, sc in next ch] three times, change to CC1, turn. –(3) 9 dc shells, 5 sc

Row 2: Ch 3, dc4tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc9tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc9tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc5tog, turn. – (2) dc9tog, (1) dc4tog, (1) dcs5tog

Row 3: Ch 3, 4 dc in same st, sl st in next sl st, 9 dc in center of dc9tog, sl st in next sl st, 9 dc in center of dc9tog, sl st in next sl st, 5 dc in top of turning ch-3, change to MC, turn. (2) 9 dc shells, (2) 5 dc shells

Row 4: Ch 1, sl st in same st, ch 3, dc9tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc9tog, ch 3, sl st in next st, ch 3, dc9tog, ch 3, sl st in last st, turn.

Row 5: Ch 1, sl st in same st, 9 dc in center of dc9tog, sl st in next sl st, 9 dc in center of dc9tog, sl st in next sl st, 9 dc in center of dc9tog, sl st in last st, change to CC1, turn.

Row 6-13: Rep Rows 2-5 twice.

Row 14: Rep Row 2. Fasten off.

Edging

With color MC, sc in each st across, 3 sc in corner, work evenly sc around block working 3 sc in each corner. Finish off.

Hourglass Waves- A Stunning Stitch

I really enjoy putting some classic stitches together in ways that you may not have considered. My latest design does just that. The Hourglass Waves Baby Afghan uses the Catherine Wheel Stitch to create a ripple and an hourglass appearance.

It is really the color work that makes this design come to life, and believe it or not, the color really do have an order to their repeating pattern. However the various stitches can through off this simple pattern creating a great visual interest. It is obvious that this is not your everyday baby throw.

Hourglass Waves Baby Afghan by Linda Dean www.lindadeancrochet.com

Hourglass Waves Baby Afghan Photo courtesy Crochet Now Magazine

Featured as a design in the latest issue of Crochet Now Magazine, issue 13, this blanket is one that does not just mark itself as something for a baby, it can easily grow for a toddler, a child, and created larger a great design for a teen or adult. The next opportunity I get I think I may make enlarge my own and make a version for my son. I really think he would love it in primary colors.

Sometimes people can hear the stitch pattern Catherine’s Wheel and instantly get a bit fearful, but this stitch pattern is not as difficult as you may think. Essentially it is a row of large shells, or fans, basically a large number of double crochets (treble crochets if you happen to be in the UK), worked min the same location. This is worked across a row and the following row is essentially a large decrease, worked in between the shells, pulling up loops in each of these stitches, making the fabric edge straight again. This blanket utilizes this very technique, but then highlights the shapes it can create with rows of single crochet (double crochet in the UK).

Hourglass Waves Baby Afghan by Linda Dean www.lindadeancrochet.com

Hourglass Waves Baby Afghan Photo courtesy Crochet Now Magazine

I love how the pattern is not something that you see every day, it has dimension and character.  I hope you find this design inspiring too.