1 for Me, 1 for You- Three Cables Block

Help me help local communities by creating blocks for Warm Up America, by making a block for yourself and one for a community project with this free pattern. I will be creating a new block every few weeks and sharing it with you, I just ask that make one for donation.

Warm Up America is a nationwide organization that encourages local donations, but will also except donations to be sent to their office so that blocks can be assembled and then blankets can be donated through the United States.

Three Cables Block

Even if you do not want to participate with Warm Up America, please consider creating blocks, or blankets for your local community. There are various places in every community that accept donations.

Three Cable Block

Crossing post stitches make great texture and stunning appearance, and they are not as difficult as you might think. Essentially you work post stitches 2 rows below your working row, to cross a cable the first posts worked will be shifted over by skipping stitches, and the last post stitches will be worked in the skipped stitches, crossing over the first post stitches created. These twists are highlighted more by having alternating post stitch rows worked by not crossing the post stitches, creating a visual gap between the rows of twists.

Gauge: 7”x9” rectangle

Materials

Medium weight yarn, in 4 colors MC (main color), CC1 (first cable), CC2 (large cable in middle), CC3 (last cable)

K/10 ½/ 6.5mm hook

Special Stitches

FPdc- Front Post Double Crochet: Yarn over, insert hook from front to back and then to front again around post of stitch, yarn over and draw up loop, [yarn over and draw through 2 loops on hook] twice. (see a visual on how to work the stitch here)

Block Pattern

With MC Ch 24

Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in each ch across, turn. -23 sc sts

Row 2: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across, turn.

Row 3: Rep Row 2.

Crossing Cables Row

Row 4 (Crossing Cables Row): Ch 1, sc same st, sc in next 2 sts changing to color CC1 in last st (tips for changing colors here), FPdc around stitch 1 skipped from next stitch and 2 rows below, FPdc around next st of row 2 below, FPdc around the 1 skipped stitch before the first FPdc (this is crossing over the last 2 stitches made), changing to MC, sc in the next 3 stitches in Row 4 (note you do not work in the stitches behind the FPdc stitches), change to CC2 in last st, FPdc around stitch 2 skipped from next stitch and 2 rows below, FPdc around next 2 sts of row 2 below, FPdc around the first 1 skipped stitch, FPdc around second skipped stitch (these two stitches cross over the last 3 stitches made), changing to MC, sc in next 3 stitches in Row 4, change to CC3, FPdc around stitch 1 skipped from next stitch and 2 rows below, FPdc around next st of row 2 below, FPdc around the 1 skipped stitch before the first FPdc (this is crossing over the last 2 stitches made), changing to MC, sc in the last 3 stitches in Row 4, turn.

Working First Crossed Cable Front Post Stitch of small cable, Skipping 1 stitch over, and 2 rows below
Working second FPdc of small cable.
Working last FPdc of Small Cable, working in skipped stitch and crossing over FPdc created just before.
Working first FPdc of Large Cable, skip 2 stitches and work stitch 2 row s below. Note when working the forth stitch of this cable it will cross over the first three and be worked around the first skipped stitch, this is adjacent to the main color stitches.
The top row shows the appearance of all the crossed cables.

Row 5: Ch 1, sc in next 3 sts changing to CC3 in last st, working over MC yarn sc in next 3 sts (tips for working over yarn here), change to MC, sc in next 3 sts changing to CC2 in last st, working over MC yarn, sc in next 5 sts, change to MC, sc in next 3 sts changing to CC1 in last st, working over MC, sc in next 3 sts, change to MC, sc in last 3 sts, turn.

Crochet over the main color, in odd number rows.
The Main color is not worked over in the even number rows, and instead when changing colors it bands across the back of the block.

Uncrossed Cable Row

Row 6 (Uncrossed Cable Row): Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in next 2 sts changing to CC1 in last st, FPdc around stitch 2 rows below, FPdc around next 2 stitches 2 rows below, change to MC, sc in next 3 sts changing to CC2 in last st, FPdc around stitch 2 rows below, FPdc around next 4 sts 2 rows below, change to MC, sc in next 3 sts changing to CC3 in last st, FPdc around stitch 2 rows below, FPdc around next 2 stitches 2 rows below, change to MC, sc in last 3 sts, turn.

Working first FPdc of uncrossed cable row, this stitch is directly below next stitch and 2 rows below.
Working second FPdc of uncrossed cable row of small cable, this stitch can be difficult to find as it is behind the crossed stitches, and may take a bit of practice to ensure that you find them
Appearance of uncrossed cable row on small cable.
All Uncrossed Cable Rows are shown across the top.

Row 7: Rep Row 5.

Row 8-23: Rep Rows 4-7 four times.

Row 24: Rep Row 4.

Row 25: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across.

Row 26: Rep Row 25. Fasten off, weave in ends, block.

1 for Me, 1 for You- Berries and Bobbles Block

Help me help local communities by creating blocks for Warm Up America, by making a block for yourself and one for a community project with this free pattern. I will be creating a new block every two weeks and sharing it with you, I just ask that make one for donation.

Warm Up America is a nation wide organization that encourages local donations, but will also except donations to be sent to their office so that blocks can be assembled and then blankets can be donated through the United States.

Berries and Bobbles Block

Even is you do not want to participate with Warm Up America, please consider creating blocks, or blankets for your local community. There are various places in every community that accept donations.

Berries and Bobbles Block

This block features some texture, by utilizing chain loops that create little “bumps” or “berries” while it is broken up by strips of bobbles.

Gauge: Square measures 7”x 9”

Materials

Medium weigh yarn

J/10/6.00mm crochet hook

Special Stitches

Bobble: [Yo, insert hook in stitch, yo, pull through a loop] rep 4 times, yo, pull through 8 loops.

Block Pattern

Ch 23

Row 1: Sc in second ch from hook, sc in each ch across, turn. -22sc

Row 2: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in next st, [ch 3, sc in next 2 sts] 9 times, sc in last 2 sts, turn. -9 ch-3 loops

Row 4: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each sc across, pushing ch-3 loops to the back side of work, turn.

Row 5: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in next 2 sts, [ch 3, sc in next 2 scs] 9 times, sc in last st, turn. -9 ch-3 loops

Row 6: Rep Row 4.

Rows 7-8: Rep Rows 3-4.

Row 9: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across.

Row 10: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in next st, [Bobble in next st, ch 1, sc in next 2 sts] 6 times, sc in last 2 sts, turn. -6 bobbles

Row 11: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each sc and bobble skipping ch sts, turn. -23 sc

Row 12: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across, turn.

Row 13-22: Rep Rows 3-12.

Row 23-29: Rep Rows 3-9.

Row 30: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across. Fasten off. Weave in ends.

See the texture on the Berries and Bobbles Block

Ann’s Angles Square

I am so honored to be invited to participate in this years Moogly CAL 2018 Afghan Block! This is the last square for 2018, find all the rest here, and complete your own throw using one of each square.

This year I have been playing with miter squares, and thought I would share the skill with you. A miter square is worked from two outside edges, with a decrease at the corner, until no stitches are left on either edge, creating a square.

However with this design, I then added to two edges to create an effect that is similar to a look of a square atop a square, or some say even an arrow.

The name is derived from one of my students, Ann. She is my world traveler that shares stories of all of the exotic lands she has visited. She is also a former high school mathematics instructor, and always keeps us on point with the the patterns and the various ways that the stitch counts can be effected.

Ann’s Angles Square

Materials:

*Red Heart With Love: #1562 Jadeite (A), #1101 Eggshell (B), #1207 Cornsilk (C), #1971 Tigerlily (D)

*Hook J/10/ 6.00mm

Gauge

Square= 12″ x 12″ (30.5 x 30.5 cm)

Row 1: With A, ch 42, sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next 18 sts, sc3tog over the next 3 chs, sc in the last 19 chs, turn.

Row 2: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 17 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 18 sts, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 16 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 17 sts, turn.

Row 4: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 15 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 16 sts, turn.

Row 5: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 14 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 15 sts, change to color B, turn.

Row 6: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 13 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 14 sts, turn.

Row 7: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 12 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 13 sts, turn.

Row 8: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 11 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 12 sts, turn.

Row 9: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 10 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 11 sts, turn.

Row 10: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 9 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 10 sts, change to color C, turn.

Row 11: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 8 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 9 sts, turn.

Row 12: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 7 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 8 sts, turn.

Row 13: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 6 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 7 sts, turn.

Row 14: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 5 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 6 sts, turn.

Row 15: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 4 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 5 sts, change to color D, turn.

Row 16: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 3 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 4 sts, turn.

Row 17: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 2 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 3 sts, turn.

Row 18: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 1 st, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 2 sts, turn.

Row 19: Ch 1, flsc in same st, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last st, turn.

Row 20: Ch 1, sc3tog over next 3 sts, fasten off.

Working over the ends of rows.

Row 21: With color D, join to either of edge of Row 1, ch 1, evenly work 19 sc sts across edge, 3 sc in last stitch of row 20, working down the other edge or rows, evenly work 19 sc sts across edge, turn.

Row 22: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 19 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 20 sts, turn.

Row 23: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 20 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 21 sts, turn.

Row 24: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 21 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 22 sts, change to color C, turn.

Row 25: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 22 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 23 sts, turn.

Row 26: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 23 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 24 sts, turn.

Row 27: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 24 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 25 sts, turn.

Row 28: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 25 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 26 sts, change to color B, turn.

Row 29: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 26 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 27 sts, turn.

Row 30: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 27 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 28 sts, turn.

Row 31: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 28 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 29 sts, turn.

Row 32: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 29 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 30 sts, change to color A, turn.

Row 33: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 30 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 31 sts, turn.

Row 34: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 31 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 32 sts, turn.

Row 35: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 32 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 33 sts, turn.

Row 36: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 33 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 33 sts, 3 sc in next st, working on edge of Rows 21-36 evenly sc across to the unused loops of the beg ch of row 1, sc in the next 20 unused loops, 3 sc in next st, sc in the next 20 unused loops, continue evenly sc across the ends of Rows 21-36, 2 sc in last st, sl st to join. Fasten off, weave in ends, block.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, Swatches Lie…Well Maybe….

Yes, swatches lie. Well that is a bit harsh…really they can be a bit misleading.

To start with there is the famous question, “Do I need to make a swatch?” Well only if you want to ensure that you meet the gauge of the pattern. Gauge helps to ensure that the pattern comes out the same size, but it also ensures that your fabric has the same drape as that of the original design. If this is important to you, then yes, you need to swatch.

That being said there are some road blocks that stop many people from making a swatch.

First there is no actual directions for making a swatch, the gauge lists the number of stitches and rows that fit the given measurements, but that is where the information ends. If you are a new crocheter this can be a bit difficult to decipher, as you need to read and understand your pattern and then make assumptions from this.

One of the ways to make these assumptions is simply to make a chain longer than the given measurement for the gauge. By a rule of thumb add make the swatch at least 40% bigger than is measured, so if it states 4” (10cm), make a swatch of 5 ½” (14 cm). This is so you can take the measurement from of the stitches and rows without using the edges of the swatch, as the edges can distort the measurement.

If the gauge gives a stitch pattern, work this in rows until the rows measure larger than the given measurement. However this is only step one.

The next step to ensure you are getting an accurate measurement is to block your swatch. Essentially you want to treat your wash as you would the finished item, so if it is hand washed then hand wash, if it is machine wash then machine wash, and let dry.

Now you can take the measurement and to ensure that you meet gauge, to proceed with your pattern. If you need to adjust your hook size to obtain gauge you will need to repeat the process in a new hook size and repeat.

However here is the honesty, very few of us go through these steps. I know when I get my yarn I want to dive right in and get to creating, but sometimes I do have to pay the price for this. I may need to rip back and rework if things are not coming out as expected.

So how can I find a happy medium between creating a swatch and just enjoying my crochet? My tip is to check my work regularly. I may block an item before I head to bed, after a day of stitching, and check my gauge in the morning. If it is on course I feel free to continue onward, if it is a bit off it is a day to rip back and begin anew. This may be a bit of a gamble in losing a day’s worth of work, but it keeps me enjoying my stitching while still being happy with the outcome.