1 for Me, 1 for You- Shells in a Row Block

Help me help local communities by creating blocks for Warm Up America, by making a block for yourself and one for a community project with this free pattern. I will be creating a new block every few weeks and sharing it with you, I just ask that make one for donation.

Warm Up America is a nationwide organization that encourages local donations, but will also except donations to be sent to their office so that blocks can be assembled and then blankets can be donated through the United States.

Even if you do not want to participate with Warm Up America, please consider creating blocks, or blankets for your local community. There are various places in every community that accept donations.

Shells in a Row

These simple 5 double crochet shells are just off-set from one another, but a simple contrasting row of color gives it a different feel, allowing the for a real stand out.

Working with three colors has the added benefit of having less ends to weave in, by carrying the color along the edge. To learn more about this technique, check it out here.

Gauge: 7”x9” rectangle

Materials

Medium weight yarn, in 3 colors MC (main color), CC1, CC2

K/10 ½/ 6.5mm hook

Block Pattern

With MC Ch 26

Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hook, [sk 2 chs, 5 dc in next ch, sk 2 chs, sc in next ch] 4 times, turn. -4 (5dc shells), 5 sc sts

Row 2: Change to CC1, ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across, turn. -25 sts

Row 3: Change to CC2, ch 3, 2 dc in same st, sk 2 sts, sc in next st, [sk 2 sts, 5 dc in next st, sk 2, sc in next st] 3 times, sk 2 sts, 3 dc in last st, turn. -3 (5 dc shells) 4 sc sts, 2 (3 dc half shells)

Row 4: Change to MC, ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across, turn.

Row 5: Change to CC1, ch 1, sc in same st, [sk 2, 5 dc in next st, sk 2, sc in next st] 4 times, turn. -4 (5dc shells), 5 sc sts

Row 6: Change to CC2, ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across, turn.

Row 7: Change to MC, ch 3, 2 dc in same st, sk 2 sts, sc in next st, [sk 2 sts, 5 dc in next st, sk 2, sc in next st] 3 times, sk 2 sts, 3 dc in last st, turn. -3 (5 dc shells) 4 sc sts, 2 (3 dc half shells)

Row 8: Change to CC1, ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across, turn.

Row 9: Change to CC2, ch 1, sc in same st, [sk 2, 5 dc in next st, sk 2, sc in next st] 4 times, turn. -4 (5dc shells), 5 sc sts

Row 10: Change to MC, ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across, turn.

Row 11: Change to CC1,  ch 3, 2 dc in same st, sk 2 sts, sc in next st, [sk 2 sts, 5 dc in next st, sk 2, sc in next st] 3 times, sk 2 sts, 3 dc in last st, turn. -3 (5 dc shells) 4 sc sts, 2 (3 dc half shells)

Row 12: Change to CC2, ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across, turn.

Row 13: Change to MC, ch 1, sc in same st, [sk 2, 5 dc in next st, sk 2, sc in next st] 4 times, turn, do not fasten off. -4 (5dc shells), 5 sc sts

Edge

Rnd 1: Ch 1, sc in sc in same st, sc in each st across until 1 st remains, 3 sc in last st, working over row ends evenly sc across to beg ch, 3 sc in last st, working in unused loops of beg ch, sc in each chain across, 3 sc in last st, working over row end evenly sc across, 2 sc in last st, sl st to beg sc, fasten off.

Weave in ends, block.

1 for Me, 1 for You- Berries and Bobbles Block

Help me help local communities by creating blocks for Warm Up America, by making a block for yourself and one for a community project with this free pattern. I will be creating a new block every two weeks and sharing it with you, I just ask that make one for donation.

Warm Up America is a nation wide organization that encourages local donations, but will also except donations to be sent to their office so that blocks can be assembled and then blankets can be donated through the United States.

Berries and Bobbles Block

Even is you do not want to participate with Warm Up America, please consider creating blocks, or blankets for your local community. There are various places in every community that accept donations.

Berries and Bobbles Block

This block features some texture, by utilizing chain loops that create little “bumps” or “berries” while it is broken up by strips of bobbles.

Gauge: Square measures 7”x 9”

Materials

Medium weigh yarn

J/10/6.00mm crochet hook

Special Stitches

Bobble: [Yo, insert hook in stitch, yo, pull through a loop] rep 4 times, yo, pull through 8 loops.

Block Pattern

Ch 23

Row 1: Sc in second ch from hook, sc in each ch across, turn. -22sc

Row 2: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in next st, [ch 3, sc in next 2 sts] 9 times, sc in last 2 sts, turn. -9 ch-3 loops

Row 4: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each sc across, pushing ch-3 loops to the back side of work, turn.

Row 5: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in next 2 sts, [ch 3, sc in next 2 scs] 9 times, sc in last st, turn. -9 ch-3 loops

Row 6: Rep Row 4.

Rows 7-8: Rep Rows 3-4.

Row 9: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across.

Row 10: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in next st, [Bobble in next st, ch 1, sc in next 2 sts] 6 times, sc in last 2 sts, turn. -6 bobbles

Row 11: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each sc and bobble skipping ch sts, turn. -23 sc

Row 12: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across, turn.

Row 13-22: Rep Rows 3-12.

Row 23-29: Rep Rows 3-9.

Row 30: Ch 1, sc in same st, sc in each st across. Fasten off. Weave in ends.

See the texture on the Berries and Bobbles Block

Thermal Stitch in the Round

Some crochet stitches can take on a different feel and appearance if worked in a different direction. One such stitch is the Thermal Stitch.

View of Thermal in the Round from Even Rounds

This stitch creates a dense double layer fabric that has a unique honeycombed or waffled effect, which reminds me of long-johns with little indented squares. To learn the traditional method of this stitch technique check it out in this tutorial.

I pick up this stitch again recently and begun playing with it in the round. This stitch is typically worked at only half the row height increase of the single crochet stitch, working in both its on row stitch and the one adjacent. As a result of this one, stitch stacked upon one stitch approach it takes a bit of thinking to work the flat circular increases.

The first hurdle is to actually begin the round. You really need to work 2 rows of fabric in the same beginning stitches to ensure an even fabric consistency throughout. I have found two approaches to this in the round.

Please note that I worked this fabric as a different color on each side, as it really helped me to keep the process understandable. In doing such I would drop the color, leaving the working loop for the color live and pick up the new color, switching like this between every Round. In addition, I worked the entire fabric in a spiral method, meaning I did not join the rounds when completed, I simply began the next stitches in the next round. This was also so ease of keeping track of my location in the work. I have to play a bit more with the end of the Rounds, as even working in a spiral they appear to easily as the stitches become a bit clustered and dense, but it does allow for the thermal stitch to be created.

Beginning:

Method one: The magic loop/ring/circle. Essentially this technique involves making a loop of yarn and crocheting in this loop, like when crocheting over item (like the demonstration here making holiday wreaths).

Round 1: Work 8 single crochets into the loop (color cream), turn.

Round 2:  Drop color from round one, join new color (color yellow). Working between stitches in between the stitches of Round 1, [insert your from behind the magic ring, and through the top loop closest to you in Round 1….this feels a bit awkward, but essentially what you are doing is inserting your hook into the bottom ring and the loop of the stitch in round 1, yo, pull through a loop, yo, pull through 2 loops] repeat 8 times, turn. -8 sts

Pull ring closed.

Working Round 2 of Magic Circle method, inserting hook behind ring and through top loop closest to you,
Working Round 2 of Magic Circle Method as viewed from the Wrong Side
Thermal in the Round, Completed Round 1 & 2

Method two: Working into a ring. Chain 4, and slip stitching to the first chain to form a ring.

Round 1: Ch 1, 8 sc in ring (color white), turn. -8 sts

Round 2: Drop color from Round 1, join new color (color yellow) to one “leg” of the single crochet stitch, insert hook through same point as join and the top loop closes to you of Round 1, yo, pull through a loop, yo, pull through 2 loops, [insert hook into one “leg” of next single crochet and the top loop of next stitch, yo, pull through a loop, yo, pull through 2 loops] 7 times, turn. -8 sts

Thermal in the Round, Round 2 working in the “through the stitch leg” method. Insert hook through one “leg” of the stitch and the top loop closest to you.

All Subsequent Rounds….Working the Increases

Increases need to happen in each Round, but you are essentially working the same increase for 2 rounds. Meaning that the stitch count for Rounds 3 and 4 will be in same, the same number of stitches are worked in the white, the same number in the yellow….like working two separate fabrics at once. However the increases are slightly different in approach.

Round 3: Dropping yellow and picking up white, insert hook through the front loop of Round 1, and the top loop closest to you in Round 2, yo, pull through, yo, pull through 2 loops, insert hook into same location as stitch just made and rework stitch, this is your increase. Work 2 thermal stitches in each stitch around, turn. -16 sts

Thermal in the Round, Odd Round increase

Round 4: Dropping white and picking up yellow, [insert hook through the front loop of Round 2 and the top loop closest to you in Round 3, yo, pull through, yo, pull through 2 loops, insert hook into the same front loop of Round 2, and next top loop closest to you in Round 3 (note there are already twice as many stitches in Round 3 as there are in Round 2…so there are less front loops to work into then there are completed stitches, as a result you need to increase Round 4 by working 2 stiches in the same Front loop, but do not in the top loop closest to you)] repeat 7 times, turn. -16 sts

Thermal in the Round, Even Round Increase, first stitch
Thermal in the Round, Even Round Increase, second stitch

You work the same formula for a flat circle (you can find that here), in all the rounds going forward. I tend to think of the rounds in sets, a pair of one odd round and one even round (Round 1 & 2, Round 3 & 4, Round 5 & 6, etc.) Working all increases in Odd number rounds by working into the same front loop and the same top loop closest to you. Working all Even Round increases as the same front loop but different top loop closest to you. All non-increase stitches are worked as traditional Thermal Stitch (see tutorial for basic stitch)

This subtle difference in the increases between the rounds is one reason the different colors helped me. I could remember that every time I used the yellow yarn I was doing an even number Round increase.

Thermal in the Round view from Odd Rounds

This process takes a bit of practice, but the resulting fabric has a nice textured look, and the dense nature lends itself nicely to pot holders, trivets, wash scrubby, I could even see a nice warm hat in the future.

Adding Some Height with Extended Stitches

When I am teaching I find that if my students make a mistake, it is because they are attempting something more advanced than they had learned. One such “more advanced stitch” is working Extended Stitches.

Extended stitches are a great way to make more gentle curves, or even help make gauge, and they are pretty easy to create. The technique of extending can be used with any crochet stitch, and only adds one additional step.

To create the stitch you start whichever stitch you are work, just as you always do. Meaning if you are creating a single crochet, insert you hook in the indicated stitch, yarn over and pull through; if you are creating double crochet, yarn over then insert in you hook in the indicated stitch, yarn over and pull through. The extension happens right after the “yarn over and pull through”, this is the point in a stitch that I refer to as “anchoring” as it secures the stitch being created to fabric being created.

After “anchoring the stitch” you yarn over and pull through a loop, essentially creating a chain. Then you complete the stitch as usual. This little added chain gives a little extra height to the stitch, however it does not make it as tall as the next typical stitch in crochet. This helps create a gentler curve in a gradual stitch taper.

There is only a slight difference in the appearance of these extended stitches, and that is a little extra “v” at the base of the stitch post.

Steps for working typical crochet stitches, note: all photo examples are worked to the left of the typical version of the stitch for comparison:

Extended Single Crochet (esc):

Insert hook into indicated stitch, yarn over pull through a loop to anchor, chain one, yarn over and pull through 2 loops.

Extended Half Double Crochet (ehdc):

Yarn over, insert hook into indicated stitch, yarn over pull through a loop to anchor, chain one, yarn over and pull through 3 loops.

Extended Double Crochet (edc):

Yarn over, insert hook into indicated stitch, yarn over and pull through a loop to anchor, chain one, yarn over pull through 2 loops, yarn over pull through 2 loops.

Woven Kisses Wrap- Free Pattern

For the last few years I have released new patterns featuring yarn from Lisa Souza Dyeworks to highlight the New York Sheep in Wool show, affectionately known to many simple by the town that hosts it, Rhinebeck. This year is no different.

With Rhinebeck occurring this next weekend, October 20 & 21, 2018 at the Duchess County Fairgrounds, I have designed a new shawl; Woven Kisses.

Woven Kisses is essentially a mesh, but not created with your most common stitches. It is worked with tall stitches and Love Knots (aka Solomon Knots). It works up quickly, and adds a great airiness while giving beauty. If you need to learn how to create these lofty stitches, I share how here.

This wrap is airy and have a beautiful drape. One of the things that I always find interesting is that even with the openness, it is quite warm, making for a delightful project. In addition, this entire wrap is created with only one skein of yarn, everyone loves that. It helps keep things cost effective, while also only having 2 ends to weave in, my favorite kind of project.

Even if you cannot attend Rhinebeck, you can enjoy this design, since I am sharing it as a free pattern. I hope you enjoy it and that it helps you get into the crochet season.

Woven Kisses Wrap

Materials

  • Hook size 1/9/5.5mm
  • Lisa Souza Yarns Delux Sock light weight 80% superwash merino, 10% nylon 10% cashmere (4oz/495yds): 1 skein color: Rhinebeck 2018 (www.lisaknit.com)

Gauge is not critical for this project

Finished Size approximately 24” x 84”

Row 1: Ch 2, sc in 2nd ch from hook, 50 LK, turn.

Row 2: Ch 4 (counts as tr now and throughout), LK, tr in knot between 2 LK, [LK, tr between next 2 LK] rep 48 times, LK, tr in last knot, turn.

Row 3: Ch 4, [LK, tr in next tr] rep across, turn.

Row 4-26: Rep Row 3. Fasten off, block.