Ann’s Angles Square

I am so honored to be invited to participate in this years Moogly CAL 2018 Afghan Block! This is the last square for 2018, find all the rest here, and complete your own throw using one of each square.

This year I have been playing with miter squares, and thought I would share the skill with you. A miter square is worked from two outside edges, with a decrease at the corner, until no stitches are left on either edge, creating a square.

However with this design, I then added to two edges to create an effect that is similar to a look of a square atop a square, or some say even an arrow.

The name is derived from one of my students, Ann. She is my world traveler that shares stories of all of the exotic lands she has visited. She is also a former high school mathematics instructor, and always keeps us on point with the the patterns and the various ways that the stitch counts can be effected.

Ann’s Angles Square

Materials:

*Red Heart With Love: #1562 Jadeite (A), #1101 Eggshell (B), #1207 Cornsilk (C), #1971 Tigerlily (D)

*Hook J/10/ 6.00mm

Gauge

Square= 12″ x 12″ (30.5 x 30.5 cm)

Row 1: With A, ch 42, sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next 18 sts, sc3tog over the next 3 chs, sc in the last 19 chs, turn.

Row 2: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 17 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 18 sts, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 16 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 17 sts, turn.

Row 4: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 15 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 16 sts, turn.

Row 5: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 14 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 15 sts, change to color B, turn.

Row 6: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 13 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 14 sts, turn.

Row 7: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 12 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 13 sts, turn.

Row 8: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 11 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 12 sts, turn.

Row 9: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 10 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 11 sts, turn.

Row 10: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 9 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 10 sts, change to color C, turn.

Row 11: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 8 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 9 sts, turn.

Row 12: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 7 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 8 sts, turn.

Row 13: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 6 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 7 sts, turn.

Row 14: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 5 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 6 sts, turn.

Row 15: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 4 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 5 sts, change to color D, turn.

Row 16: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 3 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 4 sts, turn.

Row 17: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 2 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 3 sts, turn.

Row 18: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 1 st, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 2 sts, turn.

Row 19: Ch 1, flsc in same st, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last st, turn.

Row 20: Ch 1, sc3tog over next 3 sts, fasten off.

Working over the ends of rows.

Row 21: With color D, join to either of edge of Row 1, ch 1, evenly work 19 sc sts across edge, 3 sc in last stitch of row 20, working down the other edge or rows, evenly work 19 sc sts across edge, turn.

Row 22: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 19 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 20 sts, turn.

Row 23: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 20 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 21 sts, turn.

Row 24: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 21 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 22 sts, change to color C, turn.

Row 25: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 22 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 23 sts, turn.

Row 26: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 23 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 24 sts, turn.

Row 27: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 24 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 25 sts, turn.

Row 28: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 25 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 26 sts, change to color B, turn.

Row 29: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 26 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 27 sts, turn.

Row 30: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 27 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 28 sts, turn.

Row 31: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 28 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 29 sts, turn.

Row 32: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 29 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 30 sts, change to color A, turn.

Row 33: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 30 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 31 sts, turn.

Row 34: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 31 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 32 sts, turn.

Row 35: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 32 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 33 sts, turn.

Row 36: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 33 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 33 sts, 3 sc in next st, working on edge of Rows 21-36 evenly sc across to the unused loops of the beg ch of row 1, sc in the next 20 unused loops, 3 sc in next st, sc in the next 20 unused loops, continue evenly sc across the ends of Rows 21-36, 2 sc in last st, sl st to join. Fasten off, weave in ends, block.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, Swatches Lie…Well Maybe….

Yes, swatches lie. Well that is a bit harsh…really they can be a bit misleading.

To start with there is the famous question, “Do I need to make a swatch?” Well only if you want to ensure that you meet the gauge of the pattern. Gauge helps to ensure that the pattern comes out the same size, but it also ensures that your fabric has the same drape as that of the original design. If this is important to you, then yes, you need to swatch.

That being said there are some road blocks that stop many people from making a swatch.

First there is no actual directions for making a swatch, the gauge lists the number of stitches and rows that fit the given measurements, but that is where the information ends. If you are a new crocheter this can be a bit difficult to decipher, as you need to read and understand your pattern and then make assumptions from this.

One of the ways to make these assumptions is simply to make a chain longer than the given measurement for the gauge. By a rule of thumb add make the swatch at least 40% bigger than is measured, so if it states 4” (10cm), make a swatch of 5 ½” (14 cm). This is so you can take the measurement from of the stitches and rows without using the edges of the swatch, as the edges can distort the measurement.

If the gauge gives a stitch pattern, work this in rows until the rows measure larger than the given measurement. However this is only step one.

The next step to ensure you are getting an accurate measurement is to block your swatch. Essentially you want to treat your wash as you would the finished item, so if it is hand washed then hand wash, if it is machine wash then machine wash, and let dry.

Now you can take the measurement and to ensure that you meet gauge, to proceed with your pattern. If you need to adjust your hook size to obtain gauge you will need to repeat the process in a new hook size and repeat.

However here is the honesty, very few of us go through these steps. I know when I get my yarn I want to dive right in and get to creating, but sometimes I do have to pay the price for this. I may need to rip back and rework if things are not coming out as expected.

So how can I find a happy medium between creating a swatch and just enjoying my crochet? My tip is to check my work regularly. I may block an item before I head to bed, after a day of stitching, and check my gauge in the morning. If it is on course I feel free to continue onward, if it is a bit off it is a day to rip back and begin anew. This may be a bit of a gamble in losing a day’s worth of work, but it keeps me enjoying my stitching while still being happy with the outcome.

Stair Step Wrap- Free Pattern

I have always appreciated relatively simple repeat patterns that are successful with only 1 skein, so playing with this design I have actually created a few different variation. The Stair Step Wrap increases is worked side to side, with one edge being straight and the other having all the increasing and decreasing be worked.

It is simple enough to use any yarn in this pattern, simply choose a compatible hook for the yarn, and work the increase end of the pattern until you have used half of the yarn, then begin the decrease end of the pattern. To know if you have reached the “half way” point of a skein, you can use a kitchen scale to weigh the remaining yarn and subtract this from the total weight of the skein. This should be noted on the band wrapper for the yarn, if not simply weigh all the yarn, used and unused together and divide by 2 to find the halfway point.

Stair Step Wrap

Materials:

  • Mountain Colors Twizzle light weight 85% merino wool, 15% silk yarn (100g/240 yrds) colorway Lupine
  • L/8mm crochet hook

Special Stitches

BegV= (Ch 4, dc in same st) counts as dc + ch 1

V st= (dc, ch 1, dc) in same st

Increase End

Row 1: Ch 4, dc in first ch, turn.

Row 2: BegV, sk 1 ch, dc in next ch, turn.

Row 3: Ch 3, V st between 1st 2 sts, sk dc and 1 ch, V st in next ch, turn.

Row 4: BegV, V st between next V sts, dc in turning ch, turn.

Row 5: Ch 3, V st between dc and V st, V st bet V sts, sk dc and 1 ch, V st in next ch, turn.

Row 6: BegV, V st bet each V st across, dc in turning ch, turn.

Row 7: Ch 3, V st between dc and V st, V st bet each V sts across, sk dc and 1 ch, V st in next ch, turn.

Row 8-31: Rep Rows 6 & 7

Row 32: Rep Row 6

Decrease End

Row 33: Ch 3, V st between dc and V st, V st bet each V sts across, sk dc and 1 ch, dc in next ch, turn.

Row 34: Ch 3, V st bet each V st across, dc in turning ch, turn.

Row 35-62: Rep Rows 33 & 34

Row 63: Ch 3, V st between dc and V st, sk dc and 1 ch, dc in next ch, turn.

Row 64: Ch 3, sk V st, dc in turning ch, fasten off. Weave in ends, block.

I have worked this up in a couple of different yarns, this one I like too. It was made with Plymouth Yarns Arya Ebruli 

 

Stacked Ladders Cowl- Free Pattern

I find that there are times when designs just fly off my hook, while the other times I cannot even bring myself to pick up that hook. Fortunately I have been living in the world of the former and not the latter as of late. As a result I have a new free pattern available for you!

Stacked Ladders Cowl grew out of my playing with a skein of Anzula Croquet yarn. The yarn is light weight and a 50/50 blend of Superwash Merino and Tussah Silk. It honestly is a luxurious yarn to work with, it is so soft and even what I would call billowy or lofty, while still being quite structurally strong.

This Cowl takes only 1 skein, and is a quick project, so it is perfect to check out a “new to you” yarn while creating a gift for yourself or someone special.

It is a light, airy design that is a great transition piece for fall or spring. If you are not a cowl fan, it is simple enough to just work it as a scarf.

This design is worked up with a large hook, but if you do not have anything quite this large, use the largest hook you feel comfortable with, you will be happy with the results.

Stacked Ladders Cowl

Materials:

  • Anzula Croquet light weight 50% superwash merino, 50% tussah silk yarn, (230yrds/210m/114g) sample colorway Madam
  • L/8mm crochet hook

Ch 34

Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch from hook, sk 3 chs, (ch 3, sc in next ch) 8 times, turn.

Rows 2 and 3: Ch 1, sc in same st, (ch 3, sc in next sc) 8 times, turn.

Row 4: Ch 6, dc in next sc, (ch 3, dc in next sc) 7 times, turn.

Row 5: Ch 1, sc in same st, (ch 3, sc in next dc) 7 times, ch 3, sk 3 chs, sc in next ch, turn.

Rows 6 and 7: Rep Rows 2 and 3.

Row 8: Rep Row 4.

Rows 9-100: Rep rows 5-8. Fasten off. Seam Row 1 to Row 100 while weaving in ends.

 

Camac- My New Favorite Design

Crochet and time have interesting effects for me. I have spoken before about how crochet traps memories and such (you can read that here), but designing can also be a bit of a time travel. I can be commissioned to create a design for a yarn company or magazine and after it is finished I have to wait months to see how everything finally comes out.

After waiting what seems like forever, I am finally able to share the Camac! This is a long cardigan or coat, depending on your leaning, that really lends itself to style and comfort. It is mid-thigh length and worked in as seamless as possible, needing only seam the shoulders and sleeves, the body is worked as one piece.

The simple stitch pattern really allows the yarn to make some dazzling affects as it shines as the hero. This design is created in Manos del Uruguay Gloria, a soft superwash Merino medium weight yarn, which is a dream to work with. It has nice stitch definition and has a great variety of colors (my sample is in colorway Malaquita)

There is a simple turned edge boarding this entire coat that is actually the same stitch pattern as the rest of the fabric but uses a much larger hook to create a contrast in the fabric. The change in the hook size causes a tension between the two fabrics and this causes the edge to curl. I think it adds a simple yet endearing quality to this design.

Honestly I love the mid-thigh length, it offers a wrap yourself up in it kind of feel, that warms my heart has well as keeps me warm. I tend to find that sweaters designed to hit the waist area makes me look a bit shorter while a longer length helps elongate my appearance, so I tend to lean this way a bit in my designing. If for some reason you want to make this design shorter for your liking, simply finish the row rep for the Body section a few rows early.

It is nice to finally see the end product of your work, it is usually always worth the wait (you can check it out here).

Photos courtesy of Fairmount Fibers.