Crochet Craftvent- Sugar Plum Fairy

It is hard to believe that the holiday season is fast approaching. I already have students working on crochet gifts, and have friends making holiday plans; I am in awe of this organization. I really use to be on top of the calendar many years ago, but somehow have lost this skill as I have gotten older.

Fortunately this year I have an easy count down, I designed the first Crochet Craftvent for Jimmy Beans Wool, Sugar Plum Fairy. So, if you are like me the first question is …what is Craftvent? Well in a nut shell it is like an advent calendar but with yarn and yarn related treats!

The shawl is broken up to manageable sizes and the yarn is balled up in just the right size amount so that you can open a new square on the countdown to Christmas. Just like when you were a kids and had the little boxes with pieces of chocolate; okay, my sweet tooth usually meant that I would break into several day ahead, but it was still a treat.

There are 8 different yarns highlighted in this shawl, as a result it becomes a bit of a “yarn taste” treat for the user. You get to play with many different yarn that may not be in your everyday stash of yarns. There are yarns with sparkle, yarns with great stitch definition, yarns with beautiful colors, it is a special gift with every day supply of yarn.

In addition Jimmy Beans Wool has “extra” notion treats placed throughout the calendar. What a great gift for yourself, or your favorite crocheter.

The shawl itself begins at the narrow points and increases along one edge. It is an essentially 2 different sets of patterns, one a bit lacy, one with a bit of texture. Both patterns are simple row repeats, and it is the combination of these with the color changes that creates such a dynamic piece.

Once you wrap this shawl around your shoulders it really comes to life, it really frames the face well with the colors and texture. It is stunning on everyone.

Get yours HERE! Quantities are limited!

Small Town, Small World, Big Punch in Fiber Arts

The world has ways of reminding me that it is much smaller then I think, and I have had friends recently make me think of my home town a bit differently. I grew up, currently live, and have long roots in the California gold country; a friend made a comment about living in such a historic place, and I admit I think I probably have taken that for granted. However the craziest thing isn’t how much my area has history, it is how often I learn about companies in the fiber industry that have roots here too.

 

As I was getting into the profession of crochet I began to pay a bit more attention to my surrounding in regards to other professionals. My local Fibers Guild (a groups of members that love all things yarn) I learned that there was a yarn company just a short distance from my kids school, Lisa Souza Knitwear and Dyeworks. I have worked with Lisa over the years to help create crochet designs in her beautiful yarns, as well as help work her show booth and visit various cities throughout the United States.

 

If only having a well-established yarn company in my town was enough, I also learned that a nationally recognized fiber spinning instructor and author, Lexi Boeger of Pluckyfluff, grew up in my community as well. Heck she was only a year ahead of me in high school, but my high school was large enough that I can honestly say that we did not run in the same circles. Her family owns a well-known local winery, and she has a studio just near the tasting room, that I have had the pleasure of teaching workshops at.

 

Those two connections should be more than enough, then I got into a conversation with a long time member of my Fiber Guild and when she learned where I lived she immediately assumed that I must know Lorna Miser, the creator and founder of Lorna’s Laces yarn. I did not know her, but the connection was made that as I was growing up she was starting the yarn company literally about 2 miles from my childhood home. There is even a colorway within the yarn company that features my street name, Bucks Bar. I did meet Lorna a few years later, and long after she had sold the business that is now housed in the Chicago, Illinois area, I was when working on some designs for a book that she was working on, and learned that she knew several members of my extended family. Even though up until very recently she and I only lived about thirty minutes apart, while she was starting up her latest yarn adventure, Zombie Yarns,  we would only cross paths at trade shows thousands of miles from home; but that is how it works out at times isn’t it? Never have lunch with a friend when you are in the everyday routine of home, but definitely make time when out of the ordinary grind.

 

So looking back over the connections above to my community, I thought that maybe there was something in the water or maybe every community as secret fiber artists dwelling in plain sight. Then I was at a trade show earlier this month in Columbus, Ohio when a friend and colleague escorted me over to check out a hook supplier. Honestly, I was tagging along a bit, my mind was already taking in the days discussions with various yarn companies when the gentleman, Chris Barnes, mentioned something about California. I mentioned I was from Placerville, that got him to look up, as he started he grew up there. Now I should mention that when traveling it is exciting to find someone that can pronounce the name of the town correctly (it is a short a sound), let alone know where it is without me drawing a map. We began chatting back and forth to find that we knew several of the same people and he was only two years ahead of me in high school and hung out with my cousin during his high school years. Apparently he had just taken over the business his father had started in my hometown, Brittany Needles. The company moved several years back to a little down on the northern coast that I enjoy vacationing at, Mendocino, but it started right here in my little gold rush town.

 

I know I have taken the local gold rush history for granted, but I did not realize that there was such a rich fiber arts history in the professional sense surrounding me. Honestly, since this last connection I am beginning to think I need to question the ladies at the Hangtown Fibers Guild more, as when I excitedly mention these new to me connections, they have already know everyone involved.  I wonder if there are any other industry connections hidden away in my back yard.