Woven Kisses Wrap- Free Pattern

For the last few years I have released new patterns featuring yarn from Lisa Souza Dyeworks to highlight the New York Sheep in Wool show, affectionately known to many simple by the town that hosts it, Rhinebeck. This year is no different.

With Rhinebeck occurring this next weekend, October 20 & 21, 2018 at the Duchess County Fairgrounds, I have designed a new shawl; Woven Kisses.

Woven Kisses is essentially a mesh, but not created with your most common stitches. It is worked with tall stitches and Love Knots (aka Solomon Knots). It works up quickly, and adds a great airiness while giving beauty. If you need to learn how to create these lofty stitches, I share how here.

This wrap is airy and have a beautiful drape. One of the things that I always find interesting is that even with the openness, it is quite warm, making for a delightful project. In addition, this entire wrap is created with only one skein of yarn, everyone loves that. It helps keep things cost effective, while also only having 2 ends to weave in, my favorite kind of project.

Even if you cannot attend Rhinebeck, you can enjoy this design, since I am sharing it as a free pattern. I hope you enjoy it and that it helps you get into the crochet season.

Woven Kisses Wrap

Materials

  • Hook size 1/9/5.5mm
  • Lisa Souza Yarns Delux Sock light weight 80% superwash merino, 10% nylon 10% cashmere (4oz/495yds): 1 skein color: Rhinebeck 2018 (www.lisaknit.com)

Gauge is not critical for this project

Finished Size approximately 24” x 84”

Row 1: Ch 2, sc in 2nd ch from hook, 50 LK, turn.

Row 2: Ch 4 (counts as tr now and throughout), LK, tr in knot between 2 LK, [LK, tr between next 2 LK] rep 48 times, LK, tr in last knot, turn.

Row 3: Ch 4, [LK, tr in next tr] rep across, turn.

Row 4-26: Rep Row 3. Fasten off, block.

A Crochet High- Returning from Conference

Last week I was teaching at the Crochet Guild of America annual Chainlink conference in Portland, Oregon, and you know it had to be a good time when it takes you 4 days to finally unpack. Okay 4 days may not seem like long to some, but I am usually unpacked the same day I arrive home with the laundry in the washer….however this time I just didn’t have the energy, I left it in Portland.

I taught a variety of classes, interestingly enough, I taught 4 classes at a crochet conference and none of them were actually crochet. Well one was, but it was about understanding patterns and how to read them better, the other 3 were not nearly as crochet focused.

I taught how to use beads in your work in my Beads 3 Ways class. It was a room full and everyone put their own style and twist on the necklace we were creating. There were definitely some talented and creative people in that room. They took silk, and threads (from Kreinik threads), and beads (from Bead Biz) and learned different applications to add them to their crochet (or knitting) projects.

Then I spent the entire day teaching people how to actually make yarn in my Drop Spindle class. Everyone made yarn, which is an exciting prospect just in itself. We worked with some different fibers (from Weaver Creek Fibers), and got the hang of drafting, spinning, and parking. We then plied our works and got to experience how to card wool. I haven’t taught that class in a while, and I have to say I was so impressed with what the students created.

The next morning was the class that caused me to drive 12 hours to Portland…Home Dyeing…how to safely dye your own yarn. I am pretty sure everyone had fun in this class. I had to drive to ensure that all  the equipment needed was there for me, so it allowed us to set up dyeing stations and play with all kinds of fiber (from Lisa Souza Dyeworks), with a variety of dyes and techniques. The artistic expression of the students really came out when we just jumped right into all the colors and combinations. There may have been some trash talk, completely in jest, with the class next door as they were learning how to color pool yarn. I had to put forth a challenge that were we dyeing yarn that they could not pool, my fellow instructor and friend, Vashti Braha was up for the challenge. She and I really had brainstormed ways we could work our classes together, but that didn’t come together so this little challenge was a nice addition.

Then I blinked and just like that all my classes were taught. Granted there were plenty of other events that helped cause my days to fly by, there was the member meeting I lead, and the recognition of all the Master Program graduates and Design Competition winners, then the Fastest Fingers Competition where I judged the finals, and you can never forget the CGOA Banquet and Fashion Show. It really is a whirl wind, and I didn’t even join in the actives of the first day.

I have to admit, I have been hooked since I attended my first Chainlink conference in 2011, it just feels like home.

 

Christmas In July -Slight Trail Men’s Gloves- Free Pattern

As part of the Christmas in July Crochet Along, I am happy to share Slight Trail Men’s Gloves as a free pattern for you!


Check out more Christmas in July patterns as well as giveaways here

 

Slight Trail Men’s Gloves by: Linda Dean

Fingered gloves are a must during the cold months, and are easier then they look! This simple stitch pattern offers a unique texture that gives the gloves just enough stretch.

Skill Level: Intermediate

Finished Size: men’s size gloves-10” circumference

Materials List:

  • Size I/9/5.5mm hook or hook size needed to obtain gauge
  • 1 skein of Lisa Souza Baby Alpaca Sport, sport weight,  100% Baby Alpaca Yarn (330yds/3.4 oz)  (www.lisaknit.com)
  • Stitch Marker
  • Tapestry needle

Gauge:  8 st /10 rows =2”

Pattern Note/Special Stitches

Glove are worked in a continuous spiral, there is no joining. Use stitch marker to indicate end of round.

Pattern worked in round has single crochet stitches stacked upon single crochet stitches in the back loop, and single crochet in the back loop stitches stacked upon single crochet stitches.

Magic Loop: Create a loop with yarn, inset hook, yarn over and pull through a loop, work indicated stitches in loop, pull the “tail” end of the loop to tighten.

Abbreviations:

ch: chain

rem: remaining

rep: repeat

sc: single crochet

sl st: slip stitch

sk: skip

sp: space

st(s): stitch(es)

Gloves (Make 2)

Cuff

Row 1 : Ch 10, working in back bump only, sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in each back bump across, ch 1, turn. (9 sc)

Rows 2-39: Sc in each back loop across, ch 1, turn.

Hand

Rnd 1: Turn cuff so that ends of fabric (Rows 1 and 39) are touching forming a tube, crocheting in the ends of the rows, sc in the end of each round. 39 sc

Rnd 2: *Sc in next 3 sts, sc in back loop of next 3 sts; rep from * 6 times, sc in next 3 sts.

Rnd 3: *Sc in back loop of next 3 sts, sc in next 3 sts; rep from * 6 times, sc in back loop of next 3 sts.

Rnds 4-16: Rep Rnds 2 & 3, ending with a repeat of Rnd 2.

Rnd 17: Ch 9, sk next 6 sts, *sc in back loop of next 3 sts, sc in next 3 sts; rep from * around. 33 sc and 1 ch-9 sp

Rnd 18: 9 sc in ch-10 sp, *sc in next 3 sts, sc in back loop of next 3 sts; rep from * around. 42 sc

Rnd 19: *Sc in back loop of next 3 sts, sc in next 3 sts; rep from * around.

Rnd 20: *Sc in next 3 sts, sc in back loop of next 3 sts; rep from * around.

Rnds 21-28: Rep Rnds 19 & 20

Index Finger

Rnd 1: Sc in back loop of next 6 sts, turn glove over, working in 7th stitch from end, sc in back loop, sc in back loop of next 6 sts. 13 sc

Rnd 2: Sc in back loop of each st around.

Rnd 3-16: Rep Rnd 2. Finish off, using yarn needle weave end through each stitch in last round and pull tight, sewing end closed.  

The rest of the fingers, with the exception of the thumb, start by working into Rnd 28 of the hand. Start with the glove positioned so that the index finger is to the right. (For left handed crocheters the index finger should be to the left).

Middle Finger

Rnd 1: Join yarn with sc in same st as last st for index finger on same side, sc in back loop of next 7 sts, sk next 19 sts, sc in back loop of next 5 sts, sc in next st (that was used in previous finger).  13 sc

Rnd 2: Sc in back loop of each st around.

Rnd 3-18: Rep Rnd 2. Finish off, using yarn needle weave end through each stitch in last round and pull tight, sewing end closed.  

Ring Finger

Rnd 1: Join yarn with sc in same st as last st for middle finger on same side, sc in back loop of next 7 sts, sk next 8 sts, sc in next st, sc in back loop of next 4 sts, sc in next st (that was used in previous finger).  13 sc

Rnd 2: Sc in back loop of each st around.

Rnd 3-16: Rep Rnd 2. Finish off, using yarn needle weave end through each stitch in last round and pull tight, sewing end closed.  

Pinkie Finger

Rnd 1: Join yarn with sc in same st as last st for middle finger on same side, (sc in back loop of next 7 sts, sc in next st (that was used in previous finger).  10 sc

Rnd 2: Sc in back loop of each st around.

Rnd 3-12: Rep Rnd 2. Finish off, using yarn needle weave end through each stitch in last round and pull tight, sewing end closed.  

Thumb:

Rnd 1: Working in sk sts of Rnd 17 of Hand, sc in back loop of each st, evenly work 9 sc in bottom side of ch-9. (15 sts)

Rnd 2: *Sc in back loop of each st around.

Rnd 3-14: Rep Rond 2. Finish off, using yarn needle weave end through each stitch in last round and pull tight, sewing end closed.  (note optional for texting thumbs, simply weave in end, not closing top of thumb)

Excursion Wrap! This Is A Show Stopper!

I love when a design comes out like I was hoping! Excursion Wrap came out just as I envisioned, okay, better than I could have hoped. I saw this design in my mind as soon as I laid hands on the yarn, it just came to me and I had to find a way to get it worked up in the stitches.

Excursion Wrap

That is not to say that it came out perfectly in just one try, I ripped things back several times. I played with some different combinations of stitches and color sequins before finally landing on the perfection, and the difficulty of using multiple color rows and designing like this is when ripping back I end up with many more ends to weave in….some right in the middle of rows, as I ensure the use of all the yarn.

The wrap is worked in 2 contrasting colors, which offer a bold definition of the design. The yarn is Silk Baby Camel by Lisa Souza Dyeworks, and is lusciously yummy! It is soft, but with nice structure, making it a dream to work with. Being that the pattern only takes 2 skeins, it is manageable in both crocheting and in cost.

The lacy ripple pattern is worked as a 3 row repeat, so it is simple to memorize yet keeps the pattern engaging. So you can work the stitch pattern successfully without getting bored with it.

The color sequencing is what really brings this design to life, it demands the eye to transverse the entire piece and then to look again. The altering of the stitch pattern and the colors offers a cascading effect of interest that will definitely have you garnering praise.

This wrap is a show stopper, one that makes people stop and admire your handiwork. I already have plans to work up this design a couple of more times….once is just not enough!

Get your pattern here!

 

Two New Patterns for Autumn- Half Price!

Looking back it seems like I always find myself in this place every year…Autumn. The time of year that apparently has the calendar skipping weeks on me, as I really do not know where the time has gone, while making me feel like there is a ton of things I need to get done in a short span of time. I guess it leaves me overwhelmed, exhausted, and feeling like I have many unmet responsibilities.

So in all this I guess I should be really thankful that I have managed to release not just one, but two new patterns!

Lisa Souza Dyeworks is releasing a few new yarns, and being a designer means that I can sometimes get my hands on this yarn early to create some new ideas. As was the case with Nyam (a Superfine Merino and Cashmere fine weight yarn) and Pyrenees Bulky (a 100% Organic Merino yarn) I was able to create a 1 skein project that is perfect for the holidays.

Nyam lent itself particularly well to my new pattern, Contextual Shawl. This shawl is a simple one row repeat that can really flatter almost any yarn, of any weight, of any size, any fiber content. The size can easily be adjusted to make it larger or smaller, and yet to look at it the pattern is not readily apparent. It works up fast and can be used as a project on the go. I can see this in so many different colors and styles that the possibilities are endless.

Matrix Hooded Cowl worked up great in Pyrenees Bulky. I have not made a lot of cowls in the past, but I can see the appeal. This cowl is again a one skein project that is nice and wide, and the perfect size in my opinion to warm the neck and offer protection form the cold as a hood. The pattern actually has a mirroring quality to it, as halfway across the row you work the mirror image of the beginning. It is a 4 row repeat that has a bit of fun with stacked shapes. Don’t let the open spaces fool you, paired with this yarn it is quite warm, making it tighter might just make it unwearable.

As a special offer to you, as a reader, please enjoy 50% off either of these patterns at my Ravelry Store for the next month (They will be only $2.00 then on November 30 the price resets to its original $4.00). Enjoy your quick paced autumn season.

Links:

Ravelry Store

Contextual Shawl

Matrix Hooded Cowl