Holiday Stashdown- Moebuis Cowl, Free Pattern

Wow! How is it already December? Thank you for joining me as part of the Holiday Stash Down. Check out all 15 designs, that have been released each Monday since September in an effort to help everyone get ready for the holidays.

Today I am sharing the Vas’s Hug Moebius Cowl, you could really call if an infinity scarf too, but either way I think you will enjoy it. It is worked with 2 skeins of Paintbox Yarns Simply DK, I used 2 contrasting yarns for a nice visual.

It is worked up as a long rectangle, with color changes on the same side so you can do yarn carries. Then it is seamed and edged. The Row repeat is simple, so you can finish up this project quickly and have it ready in time for you holiday gift giving.

Enjoy!

Vas’s Hug Moebius Cowl

Materials: 

*Hook size I/9/5.5mm

*Paint Box Yarns Simply DK, light weight, 100% acrylic yarn (3.5oz/100g/302yrd/276m), 1 skein each of color  #142 Tea Rose(A) & 105 Slate Gray(B)

Gauge: 4 (2dc, ch 2, sc) stitches/ 6 rows=4″ (10cm)

Finished Size: 10″ x 72″ (25 x 183 cm)

Pattern Notes:To weave in fewer ends, simply carry the yarn changes up the edge of the cowl. When working the edging you will crochet of these “yarn carries”. (Check out an example here)

If you need more visuals for working this stitch pattern, you can find it listed as the “Titter Tat” stitch here, on my blog.

Row 1: With B, ch 42, sc in 2nd ch from hook, [ch 4, sk 3 ch, sc in next ch] 10 times, turn. -10 ch -4 sps

Row 2: (2dc, ch 3, sc) in each ch-4 sp across, turn.

Row 3: (2 dc, ch 3, sc) in each ch-3 sp across, change to color A, turn.

Row 4: (2 dc, ch 3, sc) in each ch-3 sp across, turn.

Row 5: (2 dc, ch 3, sc) in each ch-3 sp across, change to color B, turn

Row 6: (2 dc, ch 3, sc) in each ch-3 sp across, turn

Rows 7-106: Rep Rows 3-6 twenty five times

Row 107: Rep Row 3

Row 108: Rep Row 4

Row 109: (Joining Row) Lay fabric out flat, turn Row 108 around and fold fabric so that Row 108 and Row 1 are together (the twist adds the Moebius), (2dc, ch 1, sl st to around skipped ch-3 of beg ch adjacent to row, ch 1, sc) in each ch-3 sp across. Fasten off.

Edging

Rnd 1: With Color B join to any stitch on any edge, ch 1, evenly sc around (because of the twist placed to create the Moebius, this one edge will continue all the way around both sides of the cowl), sl st to join, change color A, turn.

Rnd 2: Ch 1, sc in each st around, sl st to join. Fasten off, weave in ends, block.

Ann’s Angles Square

I am so honored to be invited to participate in this years Moogly CAL 2018 Afghan Block! This is the last square for 2018, find all the rest here, and complete your own throw using one of each square.

This year I have been playing with miter squares, and thought I would share the skill with you. A miter square is worked from two outside edges, with a decrease at the corner, until no stitches are left on either edge, creating a square.

However with this design, I then added to two edges to create an effect that is similar to a look of a square atop a square, or some say even an arrow.

The name is derived from one of my students, Ann. She is my world traveler that shares stories of all of the exotic lands she has visited. She is also a former high school mathematics instructor, and always keeps us on point with the the patterns and the various ways that the stitch counts can be effected.

Ann’s Angles Square

Materials:

*Red Heart With Love: #1562 Jadeite (A), #1101 Eggshell (B), #1207 Cornsilk (C), #1971 Tigerlily (D)

*Hook J/10/ 6.00mm

Gauge

Square= 12″ x 12″ (30.5 x 30.5 cm)

Row 1: With A, ch 42, sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next 18 sts, sc3tog over the next 3 chs, sc in the last 19 chs, turn.

Row 2: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 17 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 18 sts, turn.

Row 3: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 16 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 17 sts, turn.

Row 4: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 15 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 16 sts, turn.

Row 5: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 14 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 15 sts, change to color B, turn.

Row 6: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 13 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 14 sts, turn.

Row 7: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 12 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 13 sts, turn.

Row 8: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 11 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 12 sts, turn.

Row 9: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 10 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 11 sts, turn.

Row 10: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 9 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 10 sts, change to color C, turn.

Row 11: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 8 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 9 sts, turn.

Row 12: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 7 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 8 sts, turn.

Row 13: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 6 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 7 sts, turn.

Row 14: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 5 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 6 sts, turn.

Row 15: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 4 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 5 sts, change to color D, turn.

Row 16: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 3 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 4 sts, turn.

Row 17: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 2 sts, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 3 sts, turn.

Row 18: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 1 st, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last 2 sts, turn.

Row 19: Ch 1, flsc in same st, sc3tog over next 3 sts, flsc in last st, turn.

Row 20: Ch 1, sc3tog over next 3 sts, fasten off.

Working over the ends of rows.

Row 21: With color D, join to either of edge of Row 1, ch 1, evenly work 19 sc sts across edge, 3 sc in last stitch of row 20, working down the other edge or rows, evenly work 19 sc sts across edge, turn.

Row 22: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 19 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 20 sts, turn.

Row 23: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 20 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 21 sts, turn.

Row 24: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 21 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 22 sts, change to color C, turn.

Row 25: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 22 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 23 sts, turn.

Row 26: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 23 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 24 sts, turn.

Row 27: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 24 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 25 sts, turn.

Row 28: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 25 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 26 sts, change to color B, turn.

Row 29: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 26 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 27 sts, turn.

Row 30: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 27 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 28 sts, turn.

Row 31: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 28 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 29 sts, turn.

Row 32: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 29 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 30 sts, change to color A, turn.

Row 33: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 30 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 31 sts, turn.

Row 34: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 31 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 32 sts, turn.

Row 35: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 32 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 33 sts, turn.

Row 36: Ch 1, flsc in same st, flsc in next 33 sts, 3 sc in next st, flsc in next 33 sts, 3 sc in next st, working on edge of Rows 21-36 evenly sc across to the unused loops of the beg ch of row 1, sc in the next 20 unused loops, 3 sc in next st, sc in the next 20 unused loops, continue evenly sc across the ends of Rows 21-36, 2 sc in last st, sl st to join. Fasten off, weave in ends, block.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December! Time to enjoy my Craftvent CAL

So if you have been fortunate enough to receive a limited edition crochet Jimmy Beans Wool Craftvent for 2018, I thought I would share some tips and insight behind the design. Note: This kit sold out and is no longer available on their website, but it doesn’t hurt to call and see if one may be hiding in the back. (If you were unsuccessful obtaining one, read to the end and I will share some insights to making your own).

To begin with the shawl starts at a point and increase on one side until it becomes a large triangle. The first couple of rows might be the most challenging, especially since it is small and there is not much to hang on to.

The first row, essentially becomes a “V”, ensuring that all odd number rows will be worked in a “V st” pattern. The even number rows are simply double crochet stitches worked into all the stitches and spaces across.

To help you keep an accurate row count, the number of “V”’s will increase by 1 every time you work this row, while the double crochet row will always increase by 3 stitches. So if you had 3 “V” stitches in row 5, you will have 6 “V” stitches in Row 7, while if you had 10 double crochets in Row 6, then you will have 13 double crochet stitches in Row 8.

Also the increase are worked on the same side as the color changes, keeping all the pattern differences on one side of the work.

While this “V” stitch/double crochet row repeat makes up a vast portion of the design, the smaller rows of back loop single crochet stitches are always worked in pairs, and there are no increase worked in these rows. This little stitch pattern adds a great contrast in the fabric, not only visually but texturally too.

This entire kit is based upon the redesign of my Quest Shawl pattern, so if you were not able to get a Craftvent the closet to offer is the Quest Shawl pattern. The main difference in these designs is actually the color blocking. Quest has only 2 colors, while Craftvent features 8. If you want to purchase these yarns and thus make your own color blocking from the Quest Shawl, here are the yarns:

You can order a skein of each from Jimmy Beans Wool and create your own color blocking effect.

I will admit, I was so excited about this project that I purchased a kit myself, and am reworking the shawl again day by day in the calendar! You can follow along with my progress at my Facebook Page or Instagram.

Hope you enjoy this process as much as I am!

Fast Finishes- Change Colors with Less Ends to Weave

There is always more than one way to do things, and let’s be honest we all want to know the easiest ones. In crochet this usually comes down to finishing work, not many people really want to weave in ends. So when looking for a quick project that meant that we often avoid work with multiple colors, yet I have a simple trick to share.

This trick works best with a two row repeat, meaning that the pattern has you repeating the same two rows throughout, like when you see “Rows 5-95: Rep Rows 3 & 4 forty-five times”. This “rep 3 & 4” indicates a two row repeat.

Now if you change colors after ever row repeat, meaning work two rows of a color and then which to the next, that you will be changing colors on the same side of the work. Now if you use two colors you have a relatively small distance between these changes.

Instead of cutting the yarn and changing colors it is easy to pick up the color needed for the change and “carry” the yarn along the edge. You want to ensure that you do not pull the yarn too tight, or too loose, during these changes. The picture provided shows what I am attempting to explain. 

So to finish off this technique you simply work an edging on the side. This can be a simple row of single crochets or something more elaborate, but you want something that will prevent theses “carried’ strands from becoming snagged.

I find I work designs more like this in the “rush” time up to the holidays. I use to do a lot of one color projects, but now I want something that looks a little more stylish and intricate so I work these simple color changes to save the time on finish work. Less ends to weave in, means I finish that much faster.

See if it helps speed along your project.

Latest Designs, Different Names and Stunning Results

In this last few weeks I have released a couple of new designs and I wanted to share my thought about them with you.

The first is Robert’s Vowel Wrap. Yes, it is a bit of a different name, but it reflects my son’s first comment when seeing the final piece of “awe”. Apparently he likes this one, and to get a positive comment on crochet from a teenage boy…that says something.

Robert’s Vowel Wrap

This design was a bit of a challenge for me to get the math to work out for the increases, but once I found it, I am quite happy with the way it works up. Essentially it is a reverse miter rectangle, starting with a small rectangle and increasing on 2 sides until you get the nice wide width. Then the length is finished off on one edge.

The contrasting colors really are set against each other in this design, and gives a bold statement, but if you wanted to change colors to something more subtle I think you would be just as happy. (The sample is worked up in Anzula Milky Way yarn, colors Petunia and Black)

Gee Circle Shawl received its name from my daughter, because “Gee I want I one” was her statement. I guess I will have to place this design on my hook again and fulfill her request.

Gee Circular Wrap

The half circle design actually holds the shoulders, as it is slightly over a true half circle size and then quits the increase, causing the design to gently pull inward to stay in place on your shoulders. It actually works up fairly quickly and really allows two colors to play off of each other well. (The sample is worked up in Anzula Gerty yarn, colors Orchid and Victoria)

Get these patterns for yourself at my Ravelry store here,  and create some stunning projects for yourself or someone special in your life.